Dandelion

Known to many as a pesky unwanted weed, the Dandelion actually has so many benefits, you’ll wish your yard was full of them! Nature has an amazing way of providing for us. This little plant is so vigorous, it can often be found in the crack of concrete, near busy roads… it’ll get stepped on and still, it will thrive and seem almost un-killable. Rather than an unwanted weed, it really should be seen as a superfood! In fact, many fine dining restaurants will include dandelion leaves in their salads. You may have already eaten some without realizing it!

Parts Used:  Leaf, Flower; Root

Main Constituents: Sesquiterpene lactones, Vitamins A, B, C, D; choline, minerals including potassium.

Leaf/Flowers: Coumarins , carotenoids, Potassium

Root: taraxocoside, phenolic acids, iron

Actions/Medicinal Properties: Root: Alterative, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, aperient, bitter, cholagogue, hepatic, hypoglycemic, prebiotic. Leaf: Astringent, bitter, diuretic, nutritive

Dosage: For a decoction, put 3tps of Dandelion Root into 1 Cup of water and boil, simmer for 15 minutes; Drink 1 Cup 3 times daily for any condition where liver stimulation and detoxification may help, such as osteoarthritis, rheumatism, acne, and psoriasis. * For infusion, make a tea with 2tsps dry leaves over 1 cup boiling water. Drink 1 cup 3 times per day to encourage urination in conditions such as cystitis, fluid retention, or high blood pressure. * For Tinctures, take 1 tsp. of combined root and leaf tincture 3 times daily to stimulate bile flow, act as a very mild laxative, or help dissolve small gallstones.

Magickal Properties: Divination, Wishes, Calling spirits, Sending Messages, Enhancing psychic energies, Dandelions are associated with Aphrodite because of her connection with bees

Planet: Jupiter

Element:  Air

Dandelion Through History

Dandelion has been used for thousands of years, by ancient Greeks, Romans and Egyptians. The root and leaves were used as a tonic to remove toxins from the bloodstream, acting as a gentle diuretic to improve the function of the digestive system. Ancient physicians realized dandelion helped with a host of health issues including kidney, stomach, and liver disorders, skin irritations gall bladder problems, heartburn, fevers, toothaches, constipation, anemia, arthritis, diabetes, and even helps with dandruff!

Botanists say that some species of dandelion are native to North America, but historians believe early European settlers introduced it to natives. However it got here, it spread quickly and was known early on as one of the most powerful plant medicines.

Dandelion Meditation Ritual

Here’s a little something you can try at home! Many children make wishes as they blow seeds off of a dandelion head. This has been associated with dandelions for centuries, making wishes and hoping for positive things to come your way.

This is a tea meditation. I always say, you must make teas with intention. Set time aside and really focus on your tea and charge it with your love, intention, and gratitude. A cup of tea must never be rushed. It must be enjoyed, bringing all of your attention to it. It must slowly be charged with your energy.

For this ritual, we will need dried dandelion root, leaves and flowers. Bring water to a boil on the stove and then lower it to a simmer for 15 minutes. Standing over the simmering tea, breathe in the steam and visualize something positive you need in your life. Not anything material, rather think of courage, strength, becoming more vocal, love, prosperity. Take the time to think about what you could do to achieve those passions and feelings and make a mental note of it as you breathe in the aroma of the tea. Keep these intentions in your mind as you pour yourself a cup of tea; imagine that the tea has the power to make your wish a reality. Enjoy and sip your tea.

Stinging nettle

Stinging nettle is an invasive plant known for it’s painful sting; you should always wear gloves while harvesting this one!

Parts Used: Aerial parts, Leaves

Main Constituents: Amines, flavanoids, formic acid; glucoquinones, minerals ( Silica & Iron), Vitamins A, B, C; tannins

Actions/Medicinal Properties: Astringent, diuretic, tonic, nutritive, hemostatic, circulatory stimulant, galactogogue, hypnotensive, antiscorbutic, anti-allergenic, alterative, rubefacient.

Dosage: Tinctures should be taken three per day for allergic reactions; Drink 1 cup of infusions/teas daily for arthritis and rheumatism, gout, and eczema. Infusion can also be used as hair rinse for dandruff.

Stinging Nettle Through History

Though cursed by hikers, gardeners, and homeowners alike, stinging nettle is a nutritional powerhouse, a potent medicine and endlessly useful. Its praises have been sung across the globe and nettle appears in many fables and myths, as well as European, Asian, and American history. 

Records indicating the use of nettle are plentiful throughout European and Asian history. Widespread use is recorded as far back as the Late Bronze Age, or between 1570 and 1200 BCE, and continues today.

Roman soldiers in damp Britain found that rheumatic joints responded to a beating with nettles. Tyroleans threw nettles on the fire to avert thunderstorms, and gathered nettle before sunrise to protect their cattle from evil spirits.”

Folk Stories/Poems

old folk lore tells us we should cite this rhyme during the rubbing process.

Nettle in, Dock
Dock in, Nettle out
Dock rub, Nettle out

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Nettle Plant Stingers

Magical properties

Planet: Mars

Element: Fire

Properties: Protection against negative energies

Stuff a small cloth doll with nettles to remove a curse, or negative energies; Sprinkle the herb around the room to protect or add protection to sachets. Burn during rituals to banish negative energies.

Create a dream protector by filling a small cloth drawstring bag with dried nettle and hang over your pillow to protection against nightmares and negative energy while sleeping.

Make Nettle Moon Tea

Infuse water with moon energy by setting it outdoors to absorb moonlight during waxing phases; or place it near a windowsill indoors, where it can be touched by moonlight. Do this for one to three nights in a row. After infusion, bring moon water to a boil, and pour this over dried nettle leaves. let it infuse for up to 30 minutes; strain and soak up all that lovely moon energy with every sip!